AHS Blog  |  News

Call for Papers Deadline Extended to June 30, 2020

Date Posted: May 22, 2020       Categories: News

2020 Alaska Historical Society Annual Conference
October 14 to 17, 2020
 Sitka, Alaska
“Place and Power”

Sitka from water, showing the Three Sisters in the background. Sitka Harbor-7, Alaska State Library Photo Collection.

Due to the Corona virus pandemic situation, we have extended the deadline for paper proposals until June 30, 2020.  At this time, we are still moving forward with plans for our conference to be held in person. If it turns out this is not possible, there will still be an opportunity for people to present in a virtual video conference context (more detail to follow). So, we encourage people to please submit presentation proposals.

Call for Papers
“Place and Power” is the theme for the 2020 Alaska Historical Society Conference to be held in Sitka, October 14-17.  Gathering in Sitka while the community commemorates the 1867 transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States provides a fitting location for exploring larger questions of power relations over time, such as how governmental laws and policies impact Alaskans and shape our understanding of history and identity.

 Millennia of Tlingit history are marked in clan houses, place names and clan histories intimately connected with specific places. The power relationship between the Russian American Company colony at Sitka and the Tlingit people is represented in the Fort Site from the Battle of 1804, now the Sitka National Historical Park, and in surviving structures such as the Russian Bishop’s House and St Michael’s Orthodox Cathedral. The struggle between Alaska Native people and the U.S. government is also represented in the history of the Alaska Native Brotherhood Hall, Sheldon Jackson School, and Mt. Edgecumbe High School.

Conference sessions are being planned on Women’s Suffrage, the 50th Anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), and the Legacy of Richard Nelson.  The West, including Alaska, was ahead of the nation in recognizing the rights of women, thereby challenging us to ask how place influenced attitudes and what effect the Progressive Movement had on Alaskans and their views on women’s rights. Next year, 2021, marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of ANCSA, a major political settlement with profound consequences for Native sovereignty, subsistence rights, and governmental regulations on land use. The death of noted anthropologist and nature writer Richard Nelson provides a chance to examine a legacy of recording Native relationships to place and discuss how spiritual lessons learned from elders influenced his own understanding of place.

In addition to the planned sessions, papers on all topics related to Alaska history are welcome.

Presentations are limited to 20 minutes, and all presenters must register for the conference.  To submit a proposal, please send your presentation title, an abstract of no more than 100 words, and two sentences about yourself to Rachel Mason, Program Chair, rachel_mason@nps.govProposals are due June 30, 2020.

Click here for pdf of the Call for Papers





Tundra Talks Now Online

Date Posted: May 9, 2020       Categories: News

The eight Tundra Talks and interviews recorded during the 2019-2020 Tundra Vision Lecture Series at Loussac Library in Anchorage, Alaska are now available online at a new site, Tundra Sounds. You can listen to the audio recording or access images, films and other historical material. Be sure to open the link in Google Chrome.

The site was designed and developed by University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) student Dylan DeBuse, who also conducted most of the interviews. Tundra Vision is hoping to include additional stories in the future, so stay tuned!

Thanks go to: UAA’s Paul Wasko for providing the digital platform for Tundra Sounds and to Dylan’s brother, Derek DeBuse, for developing the site’s original artwork; the Anchorage Library Foundation, The Alaska Humanities Forum, The Atwood Foundation, Sarah Preskitt and the Loussac Library staff; and this year’s terrific speakers: Marie Acemah, Angela Schmidt, Arlene Schumland & Gwen Higgins, Tim Troll, Libby Bakalar, Scott Jensen & Carolyn Hall, Rhonda McBride, and Jeff Landfield.

Thanks also go out to the Tundra Vision community, who attend the lectures and support the endeavor to bring people together through history—even if that means doing that apart right now…

Katherine Ringsmuth, PhD

Tundra Vision

https://tundravision.digication.com/Tundra





Research Opportunity in Arctic & Northern Studies at UAF

Date Posted: April 14, 2020       Categories: News

The University of Alaska Fairbanks is recruiting one student for the Master of Arts in Arctic & Northern Studies to research the Copper Valley School, a Catholic boarding school that was located near Glennallen, Alaska.

Benefits:

Tuition, monthly stipend, and health insurance.

About this Opportunity:

A partnership among Arctic & Northern Studies (ACNS) and the College of Liberal Arts (CLA) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) and the Copper Valley School Association (CVSA) is sponsoring one student to complete the M.A. in Arctic & Northern Studies and to research the history, organization and culture of the Copper Valley School.

The selected student will be a full-time Arctic & Northern Studies M.A. student pursuing either the Northern History or Individualized Concentration. The student will complete the required coursework, comprehensive exams, and project focusing on providing a historical narrative on the Copper Valley School. Throughout the two-year degree, the student will be on an assistantship that will provide tuition, health insurance, and a monthly stipend during the academic year.

All applicants to the M.A. in Arctic & Northern Studies must have a cumulative undergraduate GPA and an undergraduate major GPA of 3.0 or higher. Only one student will be selected for this specific funding opportunity. For more information about the M.A. program, visit: https://www.uaf.edu/arctic/

About the Copper Valley School:

The Copper Valley School was a Catholic boarding school located near Glennallen, Alaska. In 1956, it accepted its first students – orphans from Holy Cross. It was open for fifteen years, growing to serve more than 200 students annually from diverse backgrounds and nationalities, both Catholics and non- Catholics, and Natives and non-Natives. Although the school has been long closed, several alumni meet annually in August for a school reunion. For more information about the school, visit: http://coppervalleyschool.org/.

Contact:

If interested in this opportunity, please contact Dr. Brandon Boylan, Co-Director, Arctic & Northern Studies, at bmboylan@alaska.edu





2020 Annual Conference — Call for Papers

Date Posted: April 2, 2020       Categories: News

2020 Alaska Historical Society Annual Conference
October 14 to 17, 2020
 Sitka, Alaska
“Place and Power”

Sitka from water, showing the Three Sisters in the background. Sitka Harbor-7, Alaska State Library Photo Collection.

Call for Papers
“Place and Power” is the theme for the 2020 Alaska Historical Society Conference to be held in Sitka, October 14-17.  Gathering in Sitka while the community commemorates the 1867 transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States provides a fitting location for exploring larger questions of power relations over time, such as how governmental laws and policies impact Alaskans and shape our understanding of history and identity.

 Millennia of Tlingit history are marked in clan houses, place names and clan histories intimately connected with specific places. The power relationship between the Russian American Company colony at Sitka and the Tlingit people is represented in the Fort Site from the Battle of 1804, now the Sitka National Historical Park, and in surviving structures such as the Russian Bishop’s House and St Michael’s Orthodox Cathedral. The struggle between Alaska Native people and the U.S. government is also represented in the history of the Alaska Native Brotherhood Hall, Sheldon Jackson School, and Mt. Edgecumbe High School.

Conference sessions are being planned on Women’s Suffrage, the 50th Anniversary of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), and the Legacy of Richard Nelson.  The West, including Alaska, was ahead of the nation in recognizing the rights of women, thereby challenging us to ask how place influenced attitudes and what effect the Progressive Movement had on Alaskans and their views on women’s rights. Next year, 2021, marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of ANCSA, a major political settlement with profound consequences for Native sovereignty, subsistence rights, and governmental regulations on land use. The death of noted anthropologist and nature writer Richard Nelson provides a chance to examine a legacy of recording Native relationships to place and discuss how spiritual lessons learned from elders influenced his own understanding of place.

In addition to the planned sessions, papers on all topics related to Alaska history are welcome.

Presentations are limited to 20 minutes, and all presenters must register for the conference.  To submit a proposal, please send your presentation title, an abstract of no more than 100 words, and two sentences about yourself to Rachel Mason, Program Chair, rachel_mason@nps.govProposals are due May 31, 2020.

Click here for pdf of the Call for Papers





2020 Conference Location

Date Posted: February 14, 2020       Categories: News

AHS is pleased to announce that the Sitka Historical Society and Museum will be our hosts for the 2020 conference in Sitka from Wednesday, October 14 through Saturday, October 17. Sitka’s annual Alaska Day Festival will be held on Sunday, October 18, so AHS members have the opportunity to stay to enjoy the event.

AHS Program Chair is Rachel Mason.  Conference theme expected to be determined by the end of February.  Suggestions of theme, possible keynote speaker, and session topics are welcome—they should be sent to members@alaskahistoricalsociety.org

Visit the Conference Website to find information about the 2020 conference, location, schedule, travel, and local accommodations.